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NY Corruption and graft, does it ever end? Heck, can’t it even get any better? It took primaries to get rid of charity bilker Huntley and facebook slut Rivera; Only in NY, JCOPE ethics commission now being investigated for ethics violations; The unending power of Dictator Silver and Predator Lopez, and multiple cover up pals; And then there’s Arroyo, and Boyland, and Lowrey, and Gillibrand, and Bishop…

September 17, 2012

Top News Stories

Kirsten GillibrandSenator Kirsten Gillibrand Files False Tax Return, New York Times Not Interested »

NYLR Sep17 2012

Late last week, the campaign team for Wendy Long (R-NY) filed a press release  accusing Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) of filing false tax returns in 2010.   Long is currently running… / Read More »

Candidate Wendy Long speaks out on: Gillibrand Files False Tax Return

September 14, 2012 – A cursory review of Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s taxes indicates a transaction that was impossible.  But the New York Times refused to even examine the issue. U.S. Senate candidate Wendy Long said, “Two things stand out here: we have a tax code that even a U.S. Senator can’t get right and a liberal media goliath that is playing one side of this election.  Neither is surprising, and both are wrong.” Read More…

NYS Primaries, Voter turnout, as usual, is just pathetic: 

The turnout for a rare Thursday primary overall and including key Senate races averaged about 13 percent, according to a preliminary review by NYPIRG.

‘Dirty duo’ NY politicians go down to defeat

By DAVID SEIFMAN, CARL CAMPANILE and CANDACE AMOS Additional reporting by Candice M. Giove

Last Updated:          4:13 AM, September 14,  2012

Tomas E. Gaston

Well, two out of three ain’t bad. Assemblywoman Naomi  Rivera (above), who allegedly employed her boy toys, and State Sen. Shirley  Huntley, who allegedly turned her tax-funded nonprofit into a piggy bank, were  both clobbered. But two allies of Vito “Gropez” Lopez won.

Two allegedly corrupt politicians — Queens state Sen. Shirley Huntley and  Bronx Assemblywoman Naomi Rivera — got the boot yesterday in Democratic  primaries.

Huntley was trounced by Councilman James Sanders, who got 4,979 votes, or 57  percent of the tally, to 3,477 votes, or 40 percent, for Huntley with all of the  machine ballots recorded.

Huntley was indicted on Aug. 27 on charges of falsifying documents to conceal  the fact that her niece and aide allegedly siphoned $30,000 from a sham charity  she created.

A subdued Huntley last night refuse to concede.

“Thank you for your support. We won’t know the results until all the votes  are turned in,” she told supporters in Jamaica.

“I’m tired. I’m going home.”

In The Bronx, Rivera, who allegedly hired two of her boy toys — one for a  taxpayer-funded position and the other for a job on a charity that collected  government funds — was also history.

She appointed ex-squeeze Vincent Pinela executive director of the nonprofit  Bronx Council for Economic Development.

Her current beau, Tommy Torres, was hired at her Assembly office while he was  a full-time public-school teacher.

Four investigative agencies are probing Rivera’s hiring practices.

In a stunning upset, challenger Mark Gjonaj handily defeated Rivera by 2,407  votes, or 52 percent, to 1,894 votes, or 41 percent, for Rivera.

Sources close to Rivera said she even lost to Gjonaj in precincts once  considered her strongholds.

Gjonaj promised honest government at his rousing victory party at Maestro’s  on Bronxdale Avenue.

“This is a victory for all of the people of the 80th Assembly District,’’ he  said. “They deserve someone just as hardworking as they are.’’

Meanwhile, Assemblyman Vito Lopez, the former Brooklyn Democratic boss caught  up in a sex-harassment scandal, won one proxy battle and was ahead in a  second.

Brooklyn state Sen. Martin Dilan, a Lopez ally, routed challenger Jason Otano  by more than 40 points — even though Otano used the scandal as a campaign  issue.

Another Lopez ally, Chris Olechowski, appeared headed for victory over  Lincoln Restler in a Brooklyn district leader’s race.

In still another closely watched race, Manhattan state Sen. Adriano Espaillat  crushed challenger Assemblyman Guillermo Linares, 62-38 percent.

Espaillat, who narrowly lost a congressional primary to dethrone Rep.  Charles Rangel, is now the odds-on favorite to succeed him.

Democrat By Day, Facebook Slut By Night

Posted by on Aug 12, 2012 at 8:45 am
rivera2Apparently some people think the Internet is still private. Even if you’re a politician. And you post photos of yourself wearing lingerie. Sure, nobody will notice.

She’s a real swing voter.

To constituents, she’s Naomi D. Rivera, a mild-mannered, bespectacled Bronx assemblywoman whose social-media page is dotted with her accomplishments, thoughtful sayings and the latest neighborhood news.

But on another, secret Facebook page, she’s Daniela Rivera, a sultry single 47-year-old who shows off her curves, her dance moves and, in one photo accessible to the public, the top of her lacy red bra.

But more than anything, the lawmaker’s Internet alter-ego is devoted to Tommy Torres, a fellow Democrat eight years her junior whom she has been dating for at least two years — and whom she put on her government payroll.

Dozens of photos on Daniela’s page show Rivera with her hunky “babe” in various poses — locking lips, nuzzling his cheek and dirty dancing.

The legislator began posting romantic photos of Torres in 2009, when she created the page under “Daniela,” her middle name, and a year before she hired him or finalized her divorce from husband Antonio Rodriguez.

Torres pulled down $18,123 in taxpayer-funded salary while working out of Rivera’s Morris Park district office for four months in 2010, records show.

But exactly what he did for his $1,100-a-week rate remains unclear — as does the question of how it was even possible for him to work for Rivera when he was already working full time as a gym teacher and high-school sports coach.

According to state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli’s office and Assembly records, Torres was listed as a “full-time” community-relations director for Rivera from Aug. 30, 2010, until Jan. 1, 2011.

At the same time, city Department of Education records indicate, he worked full time at Brooklyn’s PS 157 and made extra money coaching after class. In 2010, he earned a total of $89,550 from the DOE, records show.

Now, after hooking up with the daughter of one of The Bronx’s most powerful political families, he’s aiming for a new job — the open City Council seat in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Torres did not return repeated calls for comment.

Now she’s whining about her privacy. OK. She’ll be crying about the War on Women before you know it.

Albany: NY’s crime capital? Shirley you don’t jest!

Last Updated:          12:25 AM, September 1,  2012

Shirley HuntleyThe Issue: State Sen. Shirley Huntley’s funneling $30,000 of  taxpayer money into her nonprofit.

*** Yet another rogue Democrat has been caught with her hand in the cookie jar  (“Huntley Probe Widens,” Aug. 30).

State Sen. Shirley Huntley tried to cover up $30,000 in taxpayer funds she  used for her sham of a nonprofit, The Parent Workshop.

Assemblyman Vito Lopez, Assemblywoman Naomi Rivera and Huntley — three bums  who should be thrown out of politics.

Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver should do the right thing and kill three  birds with one stone.Tommy DeJulio

Each day seems to reveal a new crop of government officials like Rivera and  Huntley, who are in the game for their own gain, constituents be damned.

Maybe it’s time we give candidates personality and psychological tests to  ferret out those with larcenist leanings.

They should be asked simple multiple-choice questions, such as: “If you found  a $100 bill on the street, would you try to find the person who lost it, drop it  in a local church charity box or use it as seed money to start your own phony  nonprofit organization?”

Their arrogance and self-interest would have them selecting the last option  every time.

UPDATE: Senator Shirley Huntley was arrested last Monday on charges that she used a sham nonprofit to line the pockets of her friends and family. Just today, it was reported that the investigation into her earmarks has been widened to every one she’s every issued. Councilman James Sanders has been running an aggressive campaign and he might now be considered the favorite when voters head to the polls on September 13th.

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A lesser known ethics/corruption case, but yet another case never the less:

Assemblywoman Carmen Arroyo hasn’t been in the limelight for controversies as recently as the others, but she has her fair share, including keeping a convicted felon on state payroll and being caught up in her grandson’s indictment. As these stories aren’t leading the tabloid covers lately, it remains to be seen if Maximo Rivera has enough electoral power to topple her.

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Rep. Nita Lowey collects an extra $10G pension on top of her salary

September 17, 2012 – Rep. Nita Lowey is the wealthiest member of New York’s congressional delegation and one of the richest members of Congress.  She’s also a double dipper.  The Westchester Democrat, who is worth at least $14.3 million, collects a $10,302 annual state pension on top of her $174…

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On winners and loosers, so far these Loosers are winners:

Vito Lopez – Sure, he’s under investigation. Sure, he’s lost two of the posts that were central to his power. Sure, he’s hiding from the press. But yesterday’s primary results showed that Brooklyn voters don’t seem to be blaming Lopez’s allies for the sexual harassment allegation leveled against him. How close they still are to Vito is unclear, but Martin Dilan, Walter Mosley and Rafael Espinal all won their races, while the most famous anti-Vito candidate, Lincoln Restler, is currently trailing Lopez’ handpicked candidate in a too-close-to-call race for Democratic district leader. Maybe Vito will be able to keep some of that clout after all.

William Boyland, Jr. – Introduce fewer bills than any other lawmaker? Check. Skip legislative sessions? Check. Stay up late playing CityVille on Facebook? Check. Get charged with bribery? Check. Get charged with bribery again after being acquitted? Check. Win primary race despite pending trial? Check!

On Lopez’s Door, A Chairman No More

Posted by: Joseph Spector –  on Sep 13, 2012

The bearing of the sticky tape behind the placard of an office in the state Legislative Office Building has almost become synonymous with corruption at the state Capitol.

You see the tape, and it might be a sign that a lawmaker either no longer resides there because of a prosecutor’s intervention or, in Assembly Vito Lopez’s case, he was stripped of his leadership duties.

For an example, here’s the door after Sen. Vincent Leibell resigned in 2010.

Or the door of Hiram Monserrate.

Or the door of Carl Kruger.

So here’s Lopez’s office in the LOB after the Brooklyn Democrat was stripped last month of his chairmanship of the Assembly Housing Committee amid sexual harassment allegations and a $103,000 taxpayer-funded settlement.

Besides the placard and power, he also lost a $12,500 a year stipend—and is under investigation.

NY Primary 2012: Martin Dilan Says He’s No Puppet, But Jason Otano Has Strings Attached

BY Celeste Katz Our Reuven Blau reports and photographs:

blau dilan 9-13-2012 11-16-18 AM_0.jpgState Sen. Martin Dilan is hitting back at his opponent for calling him a Vito Lopez puppet.

The veteran lawmaker argued that upstart candidate Jason Otano decided to run for the 18th Senate district at the behest of Rep. Nydia Velazquez payback after she was challenged by his son, Councilman Erik Martin Dilan.

“He’s the one being propped up with strings,” the elder Dilan said, referring to Otano. “I have my own record of accomplishment. I believe the other candidate, who moved to the district two years ago, has no record and all he did was attack.”

Otano has served as general counsel to Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz over the past four years.

Dilan broke his long silence over the Lopez sexual harassment scandal on his way to vote. “What happened over the last few weeks has been a distraction,” he said. “My opponent has used that incident for political motivations.”

The close Lopez ally is one of the few state pols not calling on the embattled powerbroker to step down from his Assembly seat.
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As “Gropez” Probe Widens Gillibrand Stays On the Sidelines

September 12, 2012 – As the “Gropez” probe widens, U.S. Senate candidate Wendy Long once again called upon Senator Gillibrand to end her support for Speaker Silver and tell him to step aside from his leadership position pending the outcome of investigations. Read More…

Long: Time for Gillibrand to Denounce the Culture of Corruption in Albany and Call on Speaker Silver to Step Aside

September 6, 2012 – U.S. Senate candidate Wendy Long today called on Senator Gillibrand to immediately end her support for Sheldon Silver’s leadership and the culture of corruption that makes victims of young women. Read More….

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New York’s own ‘Paterno’

NY Post September 6,  2012 by Andrea  Peyser

He’s the shame of New York. Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is the Joe Paterno of the state capital. For  decades, he has presided over the Albany cesspool…

Sheldon Silver has shelled out secret sex-harass payments  before (Local  News)

THROUGH SILENCE, NEW YORK DEMOCRATS DECLARE  WAR ON WOMEN IN ALBANY  September 6, 2012

COX: SILVER’S WAR ON WOMEN DISGRACEFUL Democrat Silence on Sexual Assault Cover-up Embarrassing September 5, 2012

COX TO SILVER: PLEASE STEP ASIDE! September 4, 2012

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City GOP targets Silver’s kids (yet another Silver corruption angle)

September 17, 2012- Furious city Republicans want the Manhattan DA to probe whether Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s kids committed voter fraud by remaining registered at Dad’s home address long after moving out. “If these allegations are true and the speaker’s family has been voting at a false address to benefit…

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Precedent means Assemblyman Vito  Lopez using taxpayer money to settle sexual misconduct case is perfectly  legal

Practice upheld  judicially in 2008 after taxpayer filed suit over a $500,000 settlement in rape  claim

NEWS Monday, September 17, 2012, 8:46  / NEW  YORK DAILY

<br />
	New York State Assemblyman Vito Lopez, seen here leaving his offices in Brooklyn last week, is under investigation by the state ethics commission.<br />
[Robert Mecea for News – New York State Assemblyman Vito Lopez, seen here leaving his offices in  Brooklyn last week, is under investigation by the state ethics commission.]

ALBANY — Using taxpayer money to settle sexual misconduct cases against  state lawmakers — like in the case of Assemblyman Vito Lopez — is controversial,  but perfectly legal.

The practice was upheld judicially in 2008 after a taxpayer filed suit in  State Supreme Court to challenge a $500,000 settlement. The state had dished out  taxpayer funds to a legislative staffer who in 2004 accused Michael Boxley, then  counsel to Assembly  Speaker Sheldon Silver, of rape.

In dismissing the case, which sought to have Silver and Boxley reimburse the  state, the court found there was “no allegation that Silver … caused the  wrongful expenditure, misappropriation, misapplication or any other illegal or  unconstitutional disbursement of state funds.” The Appellate Division upheld the  State Supreme Court’s dismissal.

The settlement in the Boxley case was actually hammered out as part of a  legal proceeding by former Attorney General Eliot Spitzer. The court found that  even if Spitzer had erred in judgment by agreeing to the $500,000 payout, that  was an issue for voters to decide, not the courts.

The controversial Lopez settlement — paid out to two former staffers — was  negotiated and approved by Silver and Assembly staff, not the attorney general’s  office, though current Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s office did review  early drafts.

Critics of the hush-hush arrangement, like state Conservative Party Chairman  Michael Long, argued that if it is not illegal to use $103,000 in taxpayer dough  to make Lopez’s legal problems go away, it ought to be.

“I think it’s outrageous and I think it’s theft of taxpayer money,” Long  railed. “Not only using it, but trying to keep it secret (with a confidentiality  clause).”

The Lopez case is currently the subject of investigations by the state ethics  commission and Staten Island District Attorney Dan Donovan, who is acting as a  special prosecutor. The ethics commission, which last week voted to undertake a  widespread probe, has already interviewed several officials from Silver’s office  and that of Controller Thomas DiNapoli, a source said.

Related  Stories

Some more background: Silver, a Manhattan Democrat, authorized a settlement in June over sexual harassment claims lodged against longtime Assemblyman Vito Lopez, D-Brooklyn. The settlement included $103,080 in state funds, a confidentiality clause, and the claims were never referred to the Assembly Ethics Committee (though subsequent allegations were.)

dinapoli14e-1-webState Controller Tom DiNapoli ducks responsibility in Vito Lopez sexual harassment settlement »

NYLR Sep162012pm – State Controller Thomas DiNapoli’s office raised no red flags on the Vito Lopez  settlement. State Controller Tom  DiNapoli’s website declares…

Schneidy’s gropez-coverup dodge

NY Post Last Updated: September 6,  2012

State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman must be sweating up a storm, given  his role in the Gropez coverup.

Just what’s an ambitious AG to do? Why, change the subject, of course.

Which might explain The New York Times’ curiously timed report last weekend  noting that Schneiderman is now probing several private-equity firms, including  Mitt Romney’s Bain Capital. The AG, ostensibly, wants to know if the firms shifted fees into investments  in order to avoid taxes. But that probe involves federal issues over which he has no sway. Plus, one key financial practice he’s reviewing — treating those fees as  capital gains rather than as regular income — has never been ruled improper by  the IRS.

Meanwhile, Schneiderman faces some uncomfortable questions of his own in the  Vito Lopez sexual-harassment scandal:

* Did the AG and his aides conspire with Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver to  hide the $103,000 settlement of charges against Assemblyman Lopez?

* Why did his office say it was contacted merely for “an informal  consultation” about the deal, when in fact it got three separate e-mails about it, including when it was asked to flag anything “problematic”?

* Why didn’t the AG insist that Silver strike the deal’s confidentiality  clause — if such a provision really violates Schneiderman’s policy, as he now  says it does?

Yes, news of the Wall Street probe might take some heat off the AG.

But unfairly tarring the industry — a pillar of the city’s economy — can do  untold damage.

True, a similar strategy helped make a prior AG, Eliot Spitzer, governor. But  let’s just say, if Schneiderman thinks hitting financial firms and Wall Street  will get him off the hook for the Gropez mess, well . . . he deserves whatever  fate befalls him.

Sources say Assembly Speaker  Sheldon Silver may lose his two-decade hold on power amid fallout from Vito  Lopez sexual harassment scandal

Assembly Dem says its  weakest he’s been since a 2000 coup attempt. Silver at Democratic National  Convention where he plans to announce state’s support for President Obama

By   / NEW  YORK DAILY NEWS / Wednesday, September 5, 2012 …

What I Learned From My Failed (2000) Coup Against Shelly Silver

City & State on September 17, 2012. Posted in Opinion By Ed Sullivan represented the Upper West Side of Manhattan in the Assembly from 1977 to 2002.

The Daily Newssays there are rumors gathering of a possible coup against State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver as a result of his handling of the Vito Lopez sexual harassment affair. The story brought back memories for me. With all the sarcasm I can muster, I can only say: “Lots o’ luck.”

These rumors are without an in-house monger—and, like a ship without a sail or a car without a motor, they’re going nowhere. If nobody in the Assembly is going to step up to take credit for them—well, you can’t beat somebody with nobody.

And the speaker of the Assembly is somebody. He holds tremendous power within his house. It is the members of the Assembly, after all, with whom he exchanges power. They vote for him to be speaker. He appoints them to be committee chairs, deputy speaker, assistant deputy speaker, et cetera, et cetera—most of whom have lulus, salary bonuses. He signs the employment papers for all Assembly staff. Lesser perks, choice offices and parking spaces all go through his office, as do permits to travel on state business.

Any committee chair or deputy assistant with lulus or other perks would put all that at risk by putting his or her name on a coup attempt.

Whether it’s good public policy for the speaker to wield such power can be discussed at another time, perhaps. But there is no question that Shelly Silver has that power.

I know a bit about this subject firsthand. As a member of the Assembly, I was a part of the coup attempt against Silver back in May of 2000.

Michael Bragman, the majority leader of the Assembly at the time, had been simmering under the power of Shelly Silver—who, as speaker, had appointed him to his post. Bragman felt—and at that time I agreed—that Shelly had removed himself from contact with the Democratic Assembly members.

So when Mike Bragman asked me if I would join him in an attempt to change the leadership, I said, “Yes.”

But that was before Shelly heard about the coup and started to organize his defense. Shelly knew the wishes and fears of each member of the Democratic conference, because at one time or another we had each told him about them. That information was stored in his head.

Using this knowledge, Shelly asked loyal colleagues, often chairs themselves, to convince the rebels that we were making a mistake. Community leaders from the rebel members’ home districts were pressed to call and say, “Are you out of your mind?”

Shelly’s efforts started on a Wednesday. I caved on Friday, along with others. The next Monday a procedural vote was called as a test. Shelly won easily. Bragman got only 20 Democratic votes out of 98.

Bragman was stripped of his positions and perks, and soon after left the Assembly, his political career over. Those rebels who had held out until the Monday vote were punished briefly, but gradually welcomed back into the fold. Smart.

Speaker Silver might have said, “An attack that doesn’t kill me makes me stronger.” His power in the Assembly was now unquestioned. Those who had groused before became more quietly accepting.

Shelly, to his credit, took a lesson from the coup attempt. He started discussing issues more openly with the members. He began attending the conference meetings, which became more genuine forums for legislative ideas. The post-coup Democratic conference was more democratic than the pre-coup conference. So the purposes of the failed coup were somewhat achieved even though the speaker remained in power and the rebel leader was exiled.

The grievances that led to the coup in 2000 were real, and dealt with the essential functioning of the Assembly as a democratic body. But the rumors that are currently afoot stem from a procedural mistake that the speaker has already acknowledged and has promised to correct.

Any attempt at a coup now in 2012 would be seen, and should be seen, as opportunistically using a mistake as an excuse for taking power away from Shelly Silver.

Fizzle would be too strong a word to describe its certain fate.

Why Shelly Silver Must Resign

Written by Susan Del Percio on September 17, 2012. Posted in Opinion Susan Del Percio is a New York-based Republican consultant and founder of Susan Del Percio Strategies, a full-service strategic communications firm.

When the news broke last month that Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver used taxpayer dollars as hush money to settle sexual harassment claims brought against his colleague Assemblyman Vito Lopez, the speaker quickly lined up his members and a slew of political allies to defend him.

Many of them were happy to fall in line and obliged. Why wouldn’t they? Silver is one of the most powerful politicians in New York. And Albany being Albany, somewhere down the road they knew they would be handsomely rewarded with some plum appointment or lulu. So they dutifully went out and talked to the press. Some said he made a mistake, while others said he used poor judgment.

But perhaps they lined up too quickly and used some poor judgment of their own. And perhaps some of them made a mistake and forgot that Speaker Silver has done this sort of thing before.

Back in 2006 there was a lawsuit accusing Silver of failing to properly investigate another sexual misconduct charge. It was asserted that in 2001 the speaker did not investigate a complaint of sexual assault against his chief counsel, Michael Boxley. Then in 2003, not surprisingly given the nature of sexual predators, Boxley was taken away in handcuffs on a rape charge. He later pleaded out to a sexual assault charge to avoid jail time.

The suit never went to trial because, under Speaker Silver’s leadership, the Assembly agreed to pay $500,000 in taxpayer money to settle the case. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

Fast-forward. In 2012 Speaker Sheldon Silver secretly used $103,080 in taxpayer money to pay off/settle with (potato-potahto) two women who accused Lopez of sexual harassment. Of course this payoff only came to light because—you guessed it—he did it again! On Aug. 24, the bipartisan Committee on Ethics and Guidance found that Lopez was guilty of violating the Assembly’s sexual harassment policy.

Silver’s actions epitomize why the public is so disgusted with the Legislature and encapsulate what they believe is fundamentally wrong with Albany.

What this whole affair boils down to is a man of substantial power and influence abusing the public’s trust once by trying to protect his aide and then repeating this odious conduct by trying to orchestrate another cover-up to protect one of his key political allies.

So how should we proceed now? How must we finally right these wrongs—so long swept under the rug no matter how many women were hurt by their concealment?

Of course, Silver can save all of us a lot of time and simply resign. But if he doesn’t, and if he calls his conference back for a pay-raise vote, hopefully his colleagues will do the right thing and vote him out. After all, who in their right mind would support any elected official who has put so many women in harm’s way?

Until that day—unlikely as it may seem—every Assembly candidate, incumbent and challenger, must tell their communities and newspapers whether they plan to support Sheldon Silver for speaker, and the state’s editorial boards must demand the candidates’ stances if they refuse to go on the record on this matter of such critical importance to the future of our government.

We the public have a right to know if the people running to represent us are on our side—or on their own. We will never bring an end to the dysfunction in Albany as long as we keep insisting on making the same mistakes and never demanding accountability.

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When politicians face a deadlocked election, an indictment or an arrest warrant – who do they call?

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The Inspector General will investigate JCOPE for leaks stemming from its handling of the case of Vito Lopez. (Newsday)

An attorney representing two of Lopez’s alleged victims says state officials violated a confidentiality clause in a legal settlement of that matter. (DN)

  • State violated Vito hush deal: lawyer  September 14, 2012 – Here’s a novel idea, about about no more hush deals to begin with, there is are no ethics in them.
  • Ethics Board Impeded by Secrecy Rules September 13, 2012 – The state’s ethics board is coming under criticism as it launches an investigation that’s believed to focus on a sexual harassment scandal in the Assembly. As Karen DeWitt reports, the secrecy rules imposed in the laws governing the commission are causing some unanticipated problems.   When the Joint Commission on Public Ethics was formed just over one year  […]

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Lest we forget, when it comes to NY’s corruption, it’s not just state lawmakers, take a look at Congressional Democrats too:

Citizens for Responsibility & Ethics in Washington has a new list out that labels New York lawmaker Democratic Rep. Tim Bishop of Southampton on the East End of Long Island as No. 2. among the six most corrupt House members in the nation.

CREW’s report comes the same day a new New York poll by Quinnipiac found a majority of those surveyed want Gov. Andrew Cuomo to put out another fire— corruption among members of the state Legislature.

Altschuler: Rep. Bishop Should Submit to Congressional Ethics  Investigation

Tim Bishop: I am not a crook (oh yes you are)

Newsday: Former Top Law Enforcement Officer Requests Formal Congressional Ethics Investigation of Rep. Tim Bishop

NY-1: Conservative wants Rep. Tim Bishop ethics probe

ICYMI: Calls to Investigate Congressman Tim Bishop

Politico: Tim Bishop’s Bar Mitzvah Episode Could Spell Trouble “[Congressman Tim] Bishop agreed to intercede. But before Bishop and his aides completed their work on his behalf, Semler received a request from the congressman’s campaign staff, according to documents obtained by POLITICO and multiple interviews: For a contribution of up to $10,000 to Bishop’s reelection campaign.” In a separate email, Semler called the solicitation “really gross.” Read the whole story: http://politi.co/NzEcEv

The Wall Street Journal: NY Lawmaker Embroiled in Campaign Solicitation Row
“It’s clear this is an ethics violation; House rules prohibit tying official actions to campaign contributions.” Read the whole story: http://on.wsj.com/PgPe45
The New York Post: Explosive Charges vs LI Pol
“If you’re getting a campaign contribution in direct exchange for an official act, if you get a campaign contribution to thank you for an official act, that’s called a gratuity, and that’s a federal crime,” said Melanie Sloan of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. Read the whole story: http://nyp.st/Pj7TMB
Newsday Editorial: Probe campaign donation to Rep. Tim Bishop
“…the timing of an email from the Bishop campaign to hedge fund manager Eric Semler suggesting a contribution as high as $10,000 has the appearance of impropriety.” Read the whole story: http://bit.ly/R5q60M 

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