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Hurray and thank goodness: We’ve won the 51st seat in the NYS Assembly, last race finally decided, and a change in dynamics.

February 18, 2011

NY GOP: 2010 ELECTION COMES AN END – WITH GOP VICTORY IN ASSEMBLY RACE

This week, the last race in 2010 election cycle – in the nation – was decided right here in New York State.  The result:  another Republican Win!  After a 4-0 Appellate Division decision effectively ended a long recount process, Tom Kirwan (AD 100) will soon be the 51st GOP Assemblyman.  His victory gives the Republicans a super minority and changes the dynamics in the Assembly chamber for the first time in years.  The GOP can now uphold a veto by the governor and play a key role in driving government reform.  In 2010, New York Republicans won more Assembly seats than any other time since the 1970’s.  Congratulations Assemblyman Kirwan and the GOP Assembly Conference.   

NYCF: Kirwan, Assembly GOP and Marriage Wins

Well, it’s over – finally.  Whether or not you were aware of it, there was one last undecided race from last November’s election. 

 

The incumbent Democrat Frank Skartados (D-Milton) represented the 100th Assembly District. Skartados was the Democrat who during the May 2009 debate over same-sex “marriage” indicated even though he knew his vote in favor of gay “marriage” contradicted the views of his constituents and could cost him the election, he was going to do it anyway.

 

Mr. Skartados was a one and done legislator. He lost to pro-family candidate and former Assemblyman Tom Kirwan, by (unofficially) only fifteen votes.

 

Already the spin is starting saying that Skartados’ stand on same-sex “marriage” wasn’t a factor in the election, but if even sixteen people voted for Kirwan because Skartados failed to represent the views of the district, then marriage did indeed play a role in this election. 

With Assemblyman Kirwan’s win, the Assembly Republican Conference has swelled to fifty-one members. This potentially breaks Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s (D-Manhattan) super-majority. If the Governor vetoes a bill that Speaker Silver desires, Silver may no longer have the votes to override a veto.

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